In Africa’s Kalahari Desert, sparrow-sized birds called Sociable Weavers create enormous nesting structures that act like avian apartment complexes, housing weaver families by the hundreds. Nest construction in weavers usually begins with the male instigating the activity and the mate adding the finishing touches. Some predators take over the sociable weaver nest and make it their own home. Thanks, Robert of the African Pygmy Falcon and Sociable Weaver nests project for sharing the information. From the top, the nest appears to have a heavy blanket of straws with no holes for entrance. but their range is centered within the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. They are easy to spot because they look like a pile of hay stuck on otherwise empty trees or on utility poles. Cobras can wipe out a whole nest filled with eggs in one big sweep. funded by donors like you. They are easy to spot because they look like a pile of hay stuck on otherwise empty trees or on utility poles. It’s only when they are secure and older, do they move out and start having babies. They drink almost no water and live mostly on seeds and little desert food. The sociable weaver (Philetairus socius) is a species of bird in the weaver family that is endemic to southern Africa. They build large compound community nests, a rarity among birds. The family chamber is quite comfortable because it’s lined with twigs, cotton balls, and feathers. They can also attack predators in large numbers to protect their nest. Indeed, other studies of sociable weaver nest construction suggest that a minority of birds never invest in thatch construction . Sociable weavers live for nearly 10 years in the extreme conditions of the wild! Sociable weaver birds build huge nests on trees and telephone poles. The chambers are then created with independent entrances. But, sociable weaver nests have been found to be 100 years old and thriving. The sociable weavers help their neighbors with food, childcare and house chores – as good human neighbors do in tight communities. Africa, Blog Post, Destinations, Namibia, South Africa, Story, Wildlife. P icture of a sociable weaver nest structure from underneath Each hole/opening is a passage into a chamber where multiple birds live together and eggs are incubated. It is found in South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana. And haystacks on the telephone and electric poles. In Africa’s Kalahari Desert, sparrow-sized birds called Sociable Weavers create enormous nesting structures that act like avian apartment complexes, housing weaver families by the hundreds. A sociable weaver bird’s nest – inspiration for the design of The Nest. So, the sociable weaver birds like to build on telephone poles or trees with few branches. Some weavers, like the sociable weaver, however, form cooperative breeding groups, where numerous pairs build a huge communal nest together. Sometimes the nest becomes so heavy that the entire tree collapses under its weight. Sociable Weaver Nest’s Construction. We got curious so we started asking around and investigating the structures. These little birds know how to conserve resources in the arid desert and maximize their lifespan. The sociable weaver birds live together as a family unit of parents, older kids, and babies. Once sociable weavers start having babies, they have lots of them and that’s pretty much all they do. The sociable weaver’s nests do a great job of protecting the bird colony from big birds and predators. When it rains the nest becomes wet, soggy and heavy. Over the years, the birds’ droppings enrich the soil with nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, resulting in the tree growing more leaves (which giraffes eat) and providing more shade (which antelopes use in the heat of the summer) than trees without weaver nests. So they forged on alone, gradually assembling a construction team and recruiting craftsmen and artisans. Namibia’s unique desert ecosystem is home to many unusual species. A subset of sociable weavers is not observed at the nest during the day [ 33 ], and therefore these individuals can not be chased, however we suspect that this group that returns to the nest in the evening to roost. Th e nests vary greatly in size with the largest F igure 1. They all survive and thrive together in healthy nests and healthy communities. Most birds abandon their nest once the babies are grown up and start new nests every year. One of the most fascinating is the little sparrow-like birds that build enormous structures for their family for generations to come. To our surprise, we found that t, Sociable Weaver’s Lifestyle, Conservation, and Survival in the Desert, Predators and Threats for Sociable Weaver Birds, Expedition to Antartica, Chile and Argentina in Pictures, Yellowstone, Grand Teton and Glacier National Parks, African Pygmy Falcon and Sociable Weaver nests project, Luxurious Casa Míla Barcelona, a Desirable Address by Gaudi, 25 Famous Monuments of Barcelona – Spain’s Top Architectural Gems, Yellowstone Lamar Valley Wildlife and Canyons Photo Gallery. The sociable weaver birds have designed quite an engineering marvel. Sociable weaver birds keep expanding the nests so they become enormous. However, hidden underneath are small holes. Notice the cacophony of noises they made when we moved under the nest. Read more highlights from the conference. These nests are perhaps the most spectacular structure built by any bird. For the first two years of their life, young sociable weaver birds do all the house chores like bringing food and twigs; building and cleaning the nest and caring for the babies. These results provide the first description of cooperative nest construction in an entire colony and suggest potential mechanisms that may maintain cooperation. The large nest’s structure is supported strong wooden beams, filled with smaller branches and twigs to keep the structure together. Their secret to such a long life is a conservation-oriented lifestyle. Thomson suggests that the effort and ingenuity that birds put into their nests have value for many other creatures, and ornithologists should pay more attention to them as engineers. How could a haystack this large get stuck so high? The sociable weaver nest keeps the extended family cool on hot summer days and warm on cold winter nights. The weaverbirds can be found in many parts of Africa. The nests themselves do an amazing job of staying cool in summer and warm in winter, which may be why a half-dozen other bird species vie for unoccupied nest chambers. An unusual structure in Canada – Wildlife crossings in Banff, Barcelona, Blog Post, Destinations, Europe, Gallery by Continent, Gallery Europe, Spain, Story, Barcelona, Blog Post, Destinations, Europe, Featured, Spain, Destinations, Gallery by Continent, Gallery North America, North America, United States, Wildlife, Wyoming, We got curious so we started asking around and investigating the structures.
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