The first source is Cassius Dio: [The emperor Hadrian] first banished and later put to death Apollodorus, the architect, who had built the various creations of Trajan in Rome: the forum, the odeum and the gymnasium. Among his main works are: the Trajan’s Forum, Column, and Markets, the Hadrianic Pantheon, the port of Trajan in Fiumicino, the Arch of Trajan in Ancona, the Arch of Trajan in Benevento, the Bridge of Trajan over the Danube made during the conquest of Dacia, present-day Romania, etc. It must also be noted that Apollodorus' advise was accepted: the temple of Venus and Roma was in fact build on high ground, and still dominates the Sacred Way, and there is a basement that could be used to store machines for the amphitheater (= the Colosseum). Apollodorus of Damascus (active first quarter second century CE): Roman architect, courtier of the emperor Trajan. You don't understand any of these matters." The reason assigned … Apollodorus built the bridge of 1135 m in length, 15 m in width, 19 m in height, made totally in wood, and supported by the pillars deeply embedded in the bottom of the river. Most scholars believe that it is not true that Hadrian ordered the assassination of the architect. The presence of the Temple of Trajan and Plotina, added by Hadrian, seems to have been ascertained, after various alternative proposals that have proved unfounded, below Palazzo Valentini, where it was traditionally located. In his projects he used the latest advanced inventions and made a significant contribution to the development of building structures and technologies. The Roman architect Apollodorus of Damascus is mentioned in only two ancient sources, but we can also identify several of his buildings. H.B. Secondly, in regard to the statues, he said that they had been made too tall for the height of the cella. So he was eager to span it with a bridge that he might be able to cross it and that there might be no obstacle to his going against the barbarians beyond it. In contrast to the Greeks, the Romans subject matter more focused on the ruler of the time. Trajan’s Forum also remembered as Forum Ulpium in some sources is the largest and the most monumental of the Imperial Forums in Rome, the last in chronological order. Scholars have tried to establish Apollodorus' own style and identify other buildings. The arch of Trajan of Ancona certainly represents one of the most precious monumental testimonies of the Roman Marche. Damascus-born, he became architect to Emperor Trajan (98–117), and is credited with most of the Imperial buildings of the latter's reign, including the thermae and forum of Trajan, the enormous Ulpian basilica, Trajan's column, and the nearby market complex. The user using an Ad Block software cannot see the latest contents. Apollodorus of Athens, (died after 120 bc), Greek scholar of wide interests who is best known for his Chronika (Chronicle) of Greek history. It is likely that Apollodorus started his career in the army, where he met Trajan, who took him to Rome, and asked him to build a bridge across the Danube. an entrance formed by a square hall with a central four-sided portico; the real forensic square (116 x 95 m), with the convex side of the entrance, decorated with the large equestrian statue of the emperor, moved towards the entrance side; two semicircular exedras on the sides of the square; the Basilica Ulpia, an arcaded courtyard with the famous Trajan’s Column and the two libraries, Greek and Latin. Started as an efficient military engineer, he then became the official imperial architect of Emperor Trajan and then, for a short period, of the successor Hadrian. All rights reserved. This question is rather debated by scholars; in any case, it is recognized as an organic synthesis between the Italic-Roman tradition and the Hellenistic-oriental modules. Cary.]. of Trajan, and a hitherto unidentified Odeum. Some leftovers of the wonderful bridge remain near Drobeta in Romania. Image sourse: https://www.ia-ostiaantica.org. Dewing.]. Fiorella Festa Farina, Director of the Italian Institute of Culture in Damascus, described the technical prowess of Apollodorus as stemming from his cultural roots, and that he owed his mastery to "Nabataean culture filtered through Greek modes of thought." Unfortunately, the sanctuary was found on the opposite end of the forum. He sent him the plan of the temple of Venus and Roma by way of showing him that a great work could be accomplished without his aid, and asked Apollodorus whether the proposed structure was satisfactory. The complex included, in order: Image sourse: https://www.visionpubl.com. Home » Articles » Person » Apollodorus of Damascus, About Pictures Sources Countries Languages Categories Tags Thanks FAQ Donate Contact Articles Stubs. Very elegant, it was erected by the Senate and the people of Rome in 100-116 AD by Apollodorus of Damascus in Turkish marble, coming from the quarries of the island of Marmara, in honor of the emperor who had the port of the city expanded, at his own expense, improving the docks and fortifications. Quick Reference. Attempts to recognize Apollodorus' hand in the Pantheon or buildings in Ostia have been equally unsuccessful. His major works were conducted in Trajan where he constructed the Trajan’s temple, as well as, the Trajan’s walls in Rome ad 98–125 c. ). Apollodorus of Damascus (fl. Image sourse: https://collections.library.nd.edu, Info sourse: https://www.romanoimpero.com Info sourse: https://www.encyclopedia.com Info sourse: http://www.treccani.it. All content copyright © 1995–2020 Livius.org. The reason assigned was that he had been guilty of some misdemeanor, but the true reason was that once when Trajan was consulting him on some point about the buildings he had said to Hadrian, who had interrupted with some remark: "Be off, and draw your gourds. The Roman architect Apollodorus of Damascus is mentioned in only two ancient sources, but we can also identify several of his buildings. It was likely due to his influence that domes became a standard element in Roman architecture. Numerous researchers assume that Apollodorus had deviated the course of the Danube thus, causing a decrease in the level of the river. The complex, which measured 300 m in length and 185 in width, included the forensic square, the Basilica Ulpia, an arcaded courtyard with the Trajan’s Column, and two libraries. Damascus-born, he became architect to Emperor Trajan (98–117), and is credited with most of the Imperial buildings of the latter's reign, including the thermae and forum of Trajan, the enormous Ulpian basilica, Trajan's column, and the nearby market complex. Apollodorus had a significant influence on the Roman Imperial Style. The inscriptions, still legible, had gilt bronze letters, friezes and statues which were seized by Saracens in 848. The design of the structure is attributed to the architect Apollodorus of Damascus. Apollodorus exploited every space obtained by cutting the slopes of the hill and inserting different rooms at the different levels of the monument. ( fl. The architect’s father probably entered Trajan’s father’s clientele while he was in Syria. With the reliefs of the column Roman art further developed the innovations of the Flavian era, coming to definitively detach itself from the Hellenistic furrow, up to an autonomous production, and reaching absolute heights, not only of Roman civilization but of ancient art in general.
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